Climate Change Case Study: The Greenland Ice Sheet

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A CHANGING PLANET

Temperatures are rising, and so are sea levels. Storms are becoming more and more frequent and intense. Ice is melting, and ecosystems are shifting.

The effects of the changing climate can be seen all across the globe, but no where have the impacts been greater than in and around the Arctic circle.

Below is a piece of work I completed a few months back, which outlines the main changes that we have seen on the Greenland Ice Sheet, and some of the possible implications for the future.

Click on the image to view it in full size. I hope you find it of some interest!

Greenland Ice Sheet



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REFERENCES

  1. Box, J. E., and A. E. Cohen, 2006: Upper-air temperatures around Greenland: 1964-2005, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L12706, doi:10.1029/2006GL025723.
  2. Box, J.E. and D.T. Decker, 2011: Analysis of Greenland marine-terminating glacier area changes: 2000-2010, Annals of Glaciology, 52(59) 91-98.
  3. 3.      Cappelen, J., Jørgensen, B. V., & Laursen, E. V. 2001. The Observed Climate of Greenland, 1958-99-with Climatological Standard Normals, 1961-9.
  4. Fichefet, T., et al. “Implications of changes in freshwater flux from the Greenland ice sheet for the climate of the 21st century.” Geophysical Research Letters 30.17 (2003): 1911.
  5. http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence/
  6. Jungclaus, J. H., Haak, H., Esch, M., Roeckner, E., & Marotzke, J. (2006). Will Greenland melting halt the thermohaline circulation?. Geophysical Research Letters33(17), L17708.
  7. Mernild, S. H., N. T. Knudsen, W. H. Lipscomb, J. C. Yde, J. K. Malmros, B. H. Jakobsen, and B. Hasholt 2011. Increasing mass loss from Greenland’s Mittivakkat Gletscher. The Cryosphere, 5, 341-348, doi:10.5194/tc-5-341-2011.
  8. Parizek, B. R., & Alley, R. B. (2004). Implications of increased Greenland surface melt under global-warming scenarios: ice-sheet simulations. Quaternary Science Reviews23(9), 1013-1027.
  9. Parkinson, C. L., Cavalieri, D. J., Gloersen, P., Zwally, H. J., & Comiso, J. C. (1999). Arctic sea ice extents, areas, and trends, 1978–1996. Journal of Geophysical Research104(C9), 20837-20.
  10. Solomon et al. 2007, IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), Working Group 1: Climate Change 2007 – The Physical Science Basis, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge and New York
  11. Richter-Menge, J., M. O. Jeffries and J. E. Overland, Eds., 2011: Arctic Report Card 2011,http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/reportcard.
Luke Jones
Luke Jones is a mover, blogger and wellness enthusiast. He spends his time exploring and sharing ideas in mindful movement, healthy living and adventure.

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